Freud’s Mind Structure Theory Essay

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Freud’s Mind Structure Theory

Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) was a famous neurologist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. One of his theories was that the mind is made up of three parts: the id, the superego, and the ego. According to Freud, the id is the evil demon on your shoulder; it represents your most primitive impulses, such as hunger, sex, and violence. The superego, on the other hand, is the innocent angel on the other shoulder. It decides what is morally right and wrong according to what society has taught the individual. The ego basically serves as a regulator between the id’s primitive urges and the superego’s moral ideals. It assures that the id’s needs are met without over-angering the superego. Although this
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Considering Freud’s theory useful before it has been scientifically proven would be contradictory to the principle of psychology and cannot reasonably be done.

Reuben Fine, who has a doctorate in psychology from the University of Southern California, attempted to defend Freud’s ideas by claiming that the man was basically “an empirical scientist who generalized from the observations, primarily clinical, that he made” (Fine viii). Reuben Fine was correct in that Freud based his theories and assumptions on empirical clinical evidence, but the problem is that the evidence was very limited. The patients that he saw everyday in his office were not necessarily representative of the average person. This means that he was making assumptions of all people based on his observations of a few people. Even if his theories were completely accurate about those people, it does not mean that his theories would correlate with the millions of other people in the world. The problems of a minority are not indicative ofthe problems of a majority. Freud’s conclusions were empirical, but not scientific.

Freud believed that the superego evolved after the Oedipus complex was resolved. In the Oedipus complex, the male child is sexually attracted to his mother and considers his father to be a rival. According to Freud, the resolution of the Oedipus complex occurs when the child begins to identify with his father and gives up on sexual hopes directed toward

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